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Aron Govil: Cinema Should Serve a Purpose Beyond “Senseless” Entertainment

Roughly 1,500-2,000 movies are produced by India each year, making it the largest film industry in the world. Within the Indian film industry, Bollywood is the largest segment, accounting for roughly a third of ticket sales for 2020 and 44% of the net box office revenue in the country. Aron Govil has spent years as a fan and participant within the industry. He has acted in, directed and written Bollywood movies. According to the entrepreneur and film expert, Bollywood films should be about more than “senseless entertainment.” He says films provide a unique opportunity to produce beauty and expression that gives insight into Indian culture.

Aron Govil

Aron Govil

“I’m a movie buff and let films take up most of my free time,” Aron Govil says. “I have seen the good, the bad and the ugly. Not all films are masterpieces. I feel strongly that films should offer something deeper—a connection to reality, meaning and art.”

He has even gone so far as to say that some of the cinema produced by Bollywood is “senseless.” This, he notes, is not what he wants to produce, and he cautions filmmakers to know the difference. Aron Govil says that some of the biggest filmmakers in Bollywood,  could do more with their powerful platform by making films that have greater creativity, intelligence and wholesome entertainment.

“I want to make films where the families will be able to relate to themselves,” Aron Govil stated. “It has been proven that if the story and presentation are good, the films work with or without the established actors. I am against senseless cinema and will continue to bring complete quality family entertainment in the years to come.”

He has financed film projects for storylines he believed in producing. He says the first Bollywood film produced was a silent movie in 1913, and the first talkie was released in 1931. Films popular in Indian cinema are often most well known for their fantastic song and dance sequence. The aesthetics of the movies include beautiful costumes, luxurious accessories and brilliant color schemes. But, Aron Govil says, the storylines, characters and scripts have to dive into narratives that provide an important experience to the viewer.

Now, not all movies showcase the characters bursting into song. Sometimes, the music is in the background, and the dramatic flair is reserved for the details of the films. The music still tells an important part of the story, says Aron Govil, because it adds depth and feeling to the scenes.

Another meaningful change in the Bollywood film scene is the complexity of the characters. For years, says Govil, the characters had to be clearly evil or good. The good guys were heroes, and the leading women were pure. Now, the storylines are much more realistic, and the plotlines are more blurred. “Like in real life, the right and wrong choices aren’t always so cut and dried,” Govil says. “it’s valuable to have the viewer wrestle with the complexity of choice, freewill, meaning, circumstance and intent. Movie Makers can use developed characters to reflect a much more realistic take on people, relationships and personal struggles. It no longer boils down to a caricature or stereotype.”